Douglas Law Office, PLLC                                                 (606) 337-3330
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Bankruptcy - Chapter 13                                                                      This is an advertisement.

Kentucky Bankruptcy Chapter 13 Attorney

Chapter 13 bankruptcy, sometimes called reorganization bankruptcy, is quite different from Chapter 7 bankruptcy. In a Chapter 7, most of your debts are wiped out; in exchange, you must relinquish any property that isn't exempt. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you don't have to hand over any property, but you must use your income to pay some or all of what you owe to your creditors over time -- from three to five years, depending on the size of your debts and income.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy isn't for everyone. Because Chapter 13 requires you to use your income to repay some or all of your debt, you'll have to prove to the court that you can afford to meet your payment obligations. If your income is irregular or too low, the court might not allow you to file for Chapter 13.

If your total debt burden is too high, you are also ineligible. Your secured debts cannot exceed $1,010,650, and your unsecured debts cannot be more than $336,900. A "secured debt" is one that gives a creditor the right to take a specific item of property (such as your house or car) if you don't pay the debt. An "unsecured debt" (such as a credit card or medical bill) doesn't give the creditor this right.

The Chapter 13 Process

Before you can file for bankruptcy (including chapter 7 and 13), you must receive credit counseling from an agency approved by the United States Trustee's office.  For a list of approved agencies, go to the Trustee's website at and click "Credit Counseling and Debtor Education."  These agencies are allowed to charge a fee for their services, but they must provide counseling for free or at reduced rates if you cannot afford to pay.

The Douglas Law Office will guide you through each of these steps.  Contact us today at (606) 337-3330.



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